We are currently experiencing some slight logistical delays & will endeavour to get your order out ASAP

Spirits, France, Japan

Wine is being produced throughout France and has been done for over 2,500 years with certain Châteaux dating their history back to Roman times, around 6th Century BC. Ranking second in the world in per-capita consumption and first in total production quantity. More-so than the overall quantity of wine is the quantity of truly great wines coming out of France makes the nation the envy of wine-making nations worldwide.

Two concepts pivotal to the higher end French wines, in particular, are the idea of 'terroir' and the Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée (AOC) system. Terroir refers to the way the geography, geology and climate find their way into the glass, telling a story of the origin of the wine. The AOC was set up in 1935 and has the primary goal of protecting the authenticity of the wines and the livelihoods of the producers. Appellation rules strictly define which varieties of grapes and winemaking practices are approved for classification in each of France's several hundred geographically defined appellations, which can cover entire regions, individual villages or in some cases, like in Burgundy even specific vineyards.

Classic wine regions in France include Champagne (home of Champagne), Burgundy (Pinot Noir and Chardonnay), Bordeaux (Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Malbec, Petit Verdot), Alsace (Aromatic varietals), Loire Valley (Chenin Blanc, Crémant) and the Rhône Valley (Syrah, Grenache Mourvedre)

The Bordeaux classification of 1855 is still in use, as is the Sauternes and Barsac Classification of the same year. Wines from certain regions can be bought En Primeur, which is when the wine is sold prior to it being bottled.
Although Japan has a long history of viticulture and grape cultivation for table consumption, domestic wine production with locally produced grapes is much more recent (late 19th century). Today, more than 200 wineries exist in Japan. The Japanese are producing wines in a range of climates and areas throughout the country, from mountains and valleys to coastal areas, with Japan generally seeing more rainfall and humidity than the major wine-producing areas of Europe. The main winemaking region, which accounts for roughly one-third of domestic production, is in Yamanashi Prefecture. Other regions include Hokkaido, Nagano, and Yamagata. Japan cultivates a wide range of grape varieties; however, most of these are for table consumption, with only a small percentage used in domestic winemaking. Though technically no grapevines are native to Japan, the Koshu white wine grape has evolved locally over the centuries, and many consider it an indigenous variety. Koshu generally boasts citrus aromas, including grapefruit and lemon, light acidity, and lower alcohol. Other varieties include Muscat Bailey A, a red grape; Merlot; Chardonnay; Cabernet; Kerner; and Sauvignon Blanc.
View as Grid List

2 Items

per page
Set Descending Direction
Shop By
  1. Kaiyo Japanese Whisky (700mL)
    To break into the incredibly popular Japanese Whisky market, we wanted something that, just like our wine selection, would not only over-deliver in regard to complexity and flavour, but would also have a great story to accompany it. Kaiyō is ... Learn More
    pts
    David Driscoll
    pts
    Whisky Advocate
    pts
    Wine and Spirits Magazine
  2. Kaiyo 'Cask Strength' Japanese Whisky (700mL)
    To break into the incredibly popular Japanese Whisky market, we wanted something that, just like our wine selection, would not only over-deliver in regard to complexity and flavour, but would also have a great story to accompany it. Kaiyō is ... Learn More
    pts
    The Whiskey Wash
    pts
    Jonny McCormick
View as Grid List

2 Items

per page
Set Descending Direction