Sauvignon Blanc, Chinon

Sauvignon Blanc is a white grape, that has become incredibly popular, with increased plantings in Australia over the last 10 years. It grows best in the cooler wine regions.

Yarra Valley, Adelaide Hills, Margaret River, Orange in New South Wales and Tasmania are all regions which produce wonderful examples of Sauvignon Blanc. The coolest vintages have “grassy”, gooseberry characters, whereas, warmer vintages show more passionfruit flavour, but still with the trademark zingy acidity. In Margaret River, Sauvignon Blanc is often blended with Semillon, this creates a perfect partnership and a fuller style of wine. In New Zealand, Cloudy Bay in the 1980s began producing stunning Sauvignon Blanc wines with extraordinarily intense nettly, gooseberry, and asparagus fruit, that set Marlborough firmly on the world wine map. Today Sauvignon Blanc is now New Zealand's trademark grape.

Sauvignon Blanc is an important white grape in France, especially Bordeaux and the Loire Valley. It thrives on the gravelly soils of Bordeaux, where it is blended with Sémillon to produce Bordeaux Blancs and Cru Classé White Graves. Elsewhere in Bordeaux, it is also blended with Sémillon, to produce the amazing dessert wines of Sauternes. In the Loire Valley and particularly on the chalky soils found in Sancerre and Pouilly-Fumé. The wines produced are very different to New World equivalents, they tend to be less pungent, more restrained, mineral with smoky, gunflint notes.

After initial problems, it is now grown very successfully in Chile. The wines are almost halfway between the Loire and New Zealand in terms of fruit character.
The historic region of Chinon is home to some of the Loire Valley’s most celebrated Cabernet Franc wines. Unlike the rest of the Loire Valley, Chinon’s combined 19 communes (located on both sides of the Vienne River) produce predominately red wines, focusing almost exclusively on Cabernet Franc (with a small production of Rosé and Chenin Blanc also present).

Chinon is planted to more than 2,300 hectares of vines and has three main soil types: alluvial silt terraces made up of gravel and sand along the banks of the Vienne; Turonian chalk outcrops also along the river; and flinty Senonian clay and sand outcrops. The sand and gravel soils on the river’s flood plains produce light, elegant wines for early drinking while the clay and tuffeau limestone soil of the hillsides produce fuller-bodied wines meant for long aging.
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  1. ONLINE TASTING PACK - LOIRE VALLEY DEEP DIVE THURSDAY 13TH MAY 6:30PM AEST

    Loire Valley, an important wine region in France but we don't see enough of it here in Australia. We believe these wines suit our climate and lifestyle exceptionally well and so we're going to explore this region and the ... Learn More

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