Riesling, Grampians

Riesling is a white grape that is famous for its intense aromatics and crisp acidity. Riesling was the most planted white grape in Australia until the early 1990s when Chardonnay took over. Riesling flourishes in the Clare Valley, particularly Watervale, around the Polish Hill River, and in the cooler Eden Valley. Riesling is also being grown with increasing popularity in the Western Australia regions Albany, Frankland River and Porongorup. Australian Rieslings are noted for their citrus/lime fruit flavours in their youth and a smooth balance of freshness, lanolin and acid as they age. Australian botrytized Rieslings have immense levels of flavour concentration with beautiful acid and structure.

Riesling was first planted in New Zealand in the 1970s and has flourished in the relatively cool climates of the Marlborough, Central Otago area and for late harvests in the Nelson region.

Alsace is famous for producing outstanding Riesling from dry austere to Vendages Tardives and Sélection de Grains Nobles. They tend to be fuller, more savoury and viscous wines than those of other countries.

In Germany, Riesling constitutes around 20% of total plantings. The best examples are planted on south-facing slate-rich slopes. Germany produces many different styles from dry perfumed wines with racy, mineral acidity to exotically lush flavours of their great late harvest wines.
The Grampians wine region is situated near the Grampians National Park and the Pyrenees hills in Victoria. Only a two hour’s drive west from Melbourne, this area is known primarily for their luscious, full-bodied red wine such as Shiraz and Cabernet Sauvignon, but it is also known to produce crisp, citrus-driven Rieslings.

Home to over 15 wineries, Grampians enjoys a Mediterranean climate because of its closeness to the Southern Ocean which brings a wave of cool winds to the vineyards during the summer. During the daytime, the temperatures tend to range from warm to hot and it cools down to cold temperatures during the night. Autumns in Grampians are blissfully mild which allowing for ideal conditions for ripening grapes. The soil of this region is divided into two main types: soil which is acidic grey brown loamy sands and clay loam soils, and hard yellow soil with structured clay sub soils. Because of the acidity of the soils, the pH levels have to be increased with the addition of lime to make them favorable for grape growth. This may explain the hints of acidity and citruses in the wines of this region.
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  1. Best's Great Western Riesling 2020
    The Rieslings of Best’s have a proven ability to mature gracefully for 20 years or more. This example is no exception and its youthful freshness is a good sign for its long life in the cellar. It will gather complex ... Learn More
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    James Suckling
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    Ralph Kyte-Powell
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    James Halliday
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    Mike Bennie
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    Stuart Knox
    Out of stock
  2. Fallen Giants Riesling 2020
    Planted on the steep Eastern slopes of the Grampians in 1969. It represented part of the second coming of the Victorian wine industry which had seen very little new plantings since the turn of the century. The region had always had ... Learn More
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    Ralph Kyte-Powell
  3. Best's Foudre Ferment Riesling 2020
    Another cracking release of this unique and wonderful Australian Riesling. With ruthless grape sorting, wild ferment in the Foudre, extended time on skins and plenty of lees stirring, this Riesling is all about texture and complexity. But the thing that ... Learn More
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    James Halliday's Wine Companion
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