QUINTA DO NOVAL TAWNY NV

pts
James Suckling
pts
James Molesworth
SKU
QNTANVNV10 UCAU
$41.99 Per item
Price:
Bottle
750ml (Bottle)
$41.99 Per item
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Noval's Tawny Port is an elegant, fleshy wine with good richness and a fresh, tangy finish. Tinta Roriz, Touriga Francesca and Tinta Barroca are the major grape varieties, all from the estate and traditional, "A" category suppliers. This wine is aged 3+ years in big oak vats before the final blending and bottling. An intense brick color, it has a complex nose showing youthful raspberry fruit and anise. On the palate it is medium sweet, with rich fruit and a fresh finish. Try it slightly chilled as an aperitif as they do at the estate (and in France), or enjoy at room temperature with a dessert or with coffee."A simple young wine from Noval, a maker of port for nearly 300 years. The colour is more ruby-red than tawny, and the nose is fruity without showing much in the way of age. Cherry, chocolate, raisin and earthy spirit aromas lead into a very sweet, lighter style of good persistence and balance. 4 stars." Ralph Kyte-Powell, Wine and Food Winter 2011, The Age
Noval's Tawny Port is an elegant, fleshy wine with good richness and a fresh, tangy finish. Tinta Roriz, Touriga Francesca and Tinta Barroca are the major grape varieties, all from the estate and traditional, "A" category suppliers. This wine is aged 3+ years in big oak vats before the final blending and bottling. An intense brick color, it has a complex nose showing youthful raspberry fruit and anise. On the palate it is medium sweet, with rich fruit and a fresh finish. Try it slightly chilled as an aperitif as they do at the estate (and in France), or enjoy at room temperature with a dessert or with coffee."A simple young wine from Noval, a maker of port for nearly 300 years. The colour is more ruby-red than tawny, and the nose is fruity without showing much in the way of age. Cherry, chocolate, raisin and earthy spirit aromas lead into a very sweet, lighter style of good persistence and balance. 4 stars." Ralph Kyte-Powell, Wine and Food Winter 2011, The Age