Chateau Prieure-Lichine 2016

SKU
PLCS201610 UCAU
  • "The 2016 Prieuré-Lichine is one of the most beautiful and expressive wines of the year." Antonio Galloni
  • "An excellent Prieuré with good ageing potential." Jane Anson, Decanter
  • "Excellent like the 2015." James Suckling
  • 1 or more bottles
    $114.00
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  • Antonio Galloni
    96* points
  • Decanter
    95 points
  • Wine Enthusiast
    95* points
  • James Suckling
    94* points
  • Wine Spectator
    94* points

Editors notes

The 2016 Prieure-Lichine is a blend of 66% Cabernet Sauvignon, 29% Merlot and 5% Petit Verdot.

"The 2016 Prieuré-Lichine is one of the most beautiful and expressive wines of the year." Antonio Galloni

"...eventually revealing blackberry, blueberry and violet aromas, just a touch of earthiness in the background. The palate is medium-bodied with firm tannin cloaked in plenty of succulent black fruit tinged with graphite and smoke. I admire the linearity of this classic Margaux, quite persistent in the mouth with satisfying freshness from start to finish." Neal Martin

Details

Tasting Profile

  • Light (Light)
    Full (Full)
  • Low Tannin (Low Tannin)
    Tannic (Tannic)
  • Sweet (Sweet)
    Dry (Dry)
  • Low Acidity (Low Acidity)
    High Acidity (High Acidity)
  • Aroma
    • Blueberry
    • Boysenberry
    • Herbal
  • Palate
    • Blue Fruits
    • Cassis
    • Graphite

Food Pairings

  • Pork
  • Red Meat

Critic Scores & reviews

  • Antonio Galloni

    96*
    "The 2016 Prieuré-Lichine is one of the most beautiful and expressive wines of the year. Dark, sensual and inviting, it possesses remarkable depth and textural richness. All the elements are in the right place. Silky tannins, bright red fruit and soaring, lifted aromatics all contribute to the wine's sensual personality. Consulting winemakers Stéphane Derenoncourt and Julien Lavenu are doing absolutely brilliant work here. The new winery, inaugurated with the 2015 harvest, is giving the team the flexibility to pick and vinify smaller lots, which is one of the reasons quality has improved in recent vintages. The blend is 66% Cabernet Sauvignon, 29% Merlot and 5% Petit Verdot. Tasted two times. 93-96 points."
  • Decanter

    95
    "This beautiful Margaux might not exceed the 2015 but it is undeniably doing a good job of keeping up. It combines elegance and richness, with extremely well extracted deep fruits and plenty of layers of finesse in the form of charcoal, slate, grilled almonds and cloves. An excellent Prieuré with good ageing potential. Drinking Window 2027 - 2050 Tasted by Jane Anson"
  • Wine Enthusiast

    95*
    "Barrel Sample.This wine's fruit is already delicious, full of black-currant and plum flavors. It's a structured, dense wine, yet full of fruit. 93-95 points."
  • James Suckling

    94*
    "Layered and rich with plenty of ripe fruit and ripe tannins. Full body, round and chewy tannins and a citrusy finish. Excellent like the 2015. 93-94 points."
  • Wine Spectator

    94*
    "This captures the essence of the vintage, with a mix of dark plum and currant flavors, accented by cherry and raspberry fruit, all backed by energetic, brambly tannins and mouthwatering underlying acidity. Barrel Sample: 91-94 Points."

Other vintages

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Locations

France

Wine is being produced throughout France and has been done for over 2,500 years with certain Châteaux dating their history back to Roman times, around 6th Century BC. Ranking second in the world in per-capita consumption and first in total production quantity. More so than the overall quantity of wine is the quantity of truly great wines coming out of France makes the nation the envy of wine-making nations worldwide.

Two concepts pivotal to the higher end French wines, in particular, are the idea of 'terroir' and the Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée (AOC) system. Terroir refers to the way the geography, geology and climate find their way into the glass, telling a story of the origin of the wine. The AOC was set up in 1935 and has the primary goal of protecting the authenticity of the wines and the livelihoods of the producers. Appellation rules strictly define which varieties of grapes and winemaking practices are approved for classification in each of France's several hundred geographically defined appellations, which can cover entire regions, individual villages or in some cases, like in Burgundy even specific vineyards.

Classic wine regions in France include Champagne (home of Champagne), Burgundy (Pinot Noir and Chardonnay), Bordeaux (Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Malbec, Petit Verdot), Alsace (Aromatic varietals), Loire Valley (Chenin Blanc, Crémant) and the Rhône Valley (Syrah, Grenache Mourvedre)

The Bordeaux classification of 1855 is still in use, as is the Sauternes and Barsac Classification of the same year. Wines from certain regions can be bought En Primeur, which is when the wine is sold prior to it being bottled.

Bordeaux

Bordeaux produces some of the most highly sought after and revered wines in the world. Located close to the coast, in the south-west of France the town and is divided by the Gironde River. Wines to the west of the river are referred to as left bank, and are Cabernet dominant. To the East of the river, on the right bank Merlot is the dominant grape variety. Throughout the 57 appellations, over 10,000 wine-making châteaux grow the red grapes; Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot and Malbec. These are commonly blended and collectively referred to as clarets. Smaller amounts of Semillon and Sauvignon Blanc is also grown in Bordeaux.

In 1855, due to the high export demands of Bordeaux wines, Emporer Napoleon III requested an official Bordeaux classification system, based on market costs of the wines at the time. The Chateaux were classified in to five ‘growths’ from first growth to fifth growth and cru Bourgois. Also in 1855 The Sauternes and Barsac classification covered the sweeter wines, with Chateau d’Yquem the only Superior First Growth, followed by Premiers Crus and Deux Deuxièmes Crus.

Medoc

Home to over 650 vineyards and spanning over 4,900 hectares, Bordeaux’s Médoc wine region comprises four of the most distinguished wine villages in the area: Saint-Estephe, Saint-Julien, Pauillac, and Margaux. The peninsula of Médoc is home to coastal lagoons, sand dunes, and pine forests. It is known to have formed into a peninsula over time as the Garonne and Dordogne rivers carried in large quantities of mineral rich silt and light reflective, well drained gravel, which turned out to be perfect for harvesting red wine grapes such as Cabernet Sauvignon and Petit Verdot. The main aromas of the beautifully refined red wines from this area are: spices, oak, red fruit and vanilla.

The region of Médoc is divided into three areas: the Landes du Médoc, the Bas-Médoc, and the Haut-Médoc. The Landes du Médoc is located in the entire western half of the peninsula. Although there are no vineyards here, the land is still important because its pine trees protect the grape vines from the harsh cold winds blowing in from the Atlantic Ocean. The Bas-Médoc( lower-Médoc) runs downstream on the estuarine side of the peninsula. The wines produced here are usually more affordable than those produced in Haut-Médoc. Haut-Médoc (upper-Médoc) is the most well-known of the three sections. The wines produced here are some of the most expensive wines worldwide and were famously ranked in The Médoc Classification of 1855, which is to this day in use.

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About the brand Chateau Prieure-Lichine

Originally a priory of Benedictine monks who cultivated grapes for service at dinner and at religious ceremonies, practices gradually evolved by the 18th century to establish sales of the wine under the name Le Prieuré de Cantenac.
After numerous owners and numerous name changes, the estate was bought in 1951 by Alexis Lichine (only 11 hectares of untended vines remained) and was renamed in 1953. The following year Cantenac wineries were entitled to use and label under the appellation of Margaux. Sacrificing quantity for quality, trades in portions of desirable land at a loss of two to one were made with third growth neighbours Palmer, Ferrière, Kirwan, Giscours, Issan, Boyd-Cantenac and second growth neighbours Durfort-Vivens and Brane-Cantenac, adding up to 47 acres (19 ha) of vineyards by the mid-1960s. With an aim to produce a wine well beyond its classification, Lichine undertook extensive replanting, repairs and investments and brought in oenologists Emile Peynaud and Patrick Léon to advise on vat selection. By the 1970s the estate amounted to 58 hectares dispersed across the communes Cantenac and Margaux.
After Lichine's death in 1989, the estate was run by his son Sacha for several years, with oenologist Michel Rolland acting as consultant, until the estate was sold to the Groupe Ballande in 1999. The winery currently consists of about 77.5 hectares (192 acres) planted with 50% Cabernet Sauvignon, 45% Merlot, 5% Petit Verdot and employs Stéphane Derenoncourt as its consulting oenologist. The soils of Château Prieuré-Lichine are essentially made up of gravel deposited by the river during successive glacial floods in the Quaternary era. Streams resulting from the floods then cut up these sedimentary soils into well-drained mounds, which today look out over the Gironde estuary.

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