Chateau Lynch Bages 2014

SKU
CHLB201412 UCAU
The Château Lynch Bages 2014 is a blend of 69% Cabernet Sauvignon, 26% Merlot, 3% Cabernet Franc and 2% Petit Verdot matured in 75% new oak. Yields were a respectable 40 hectoliters per hectare, although that figure is less than Jean-Charles Cazes predicted earlier in the season. The nose is well defined with veins of graphite infusing the black fruit: quite strict for Lynch Bages, a little reserved at this early stage. The palate is medium-bodied with chalky tannin, racy acidity although the pH is around 3.7, linear and a little austere on the finish. This is tightly coiled at the moment, gritty in the mouth but I like the Pauillac typicité here - not a million miles away from Grand Puy Lacoste in style. This deserves respect and I suspect it will age with the style of Jean-Charles's father, who turned 80 on the day of my visit. Drink 2018 - 2040. 92-94 points Neal Martin - The Wine Advocate # 218 (Apr 2015)91-93 Points Neal Martin - The Wine Advocate #218 April 2015
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  • 's full-bodied with ultra-fine tannins
  • This is displaying terrific depth and purity today.
  • 69% Cabernet Sauvignon, 26% Merlot, 3% Cabernet Franc & 2% Petit Verdot
  • Single Bottle
    $350.00
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  • 96
  • 96

Details

Tasting Profile

  • Light (Light)
    Full (Full)
  • Low Tannin (Low Tannin)
    Tannic (Tannic)
  • Sweet (Sweet)
    Dry (Dry)
  • Low Acidity (Low Acidity)
    High Acidity (High Acidity)
  • Aroma
    • Blueberry
    • Boysenberry
    • Herbal
  • Palate
    • Blue Fruits
    • Cassis
    • Graphite

Food Pairings

  • Fish

Critic Scores & reviews

  • Wine Spectator

    96
    "Offers lovely weight and feel, with a big core of plum, blackberry and black currant fruit that manages to show refinement, while ample charcoal and warm stone notes flow underneath. This is displaying terrific depth and purity today. 93-96 points J.M. - Wine Spectator"
  • James Suckling

    96
    "This has fascinating aromas already with blackcurrants and cassis. Hints of spices. It's full-bodied with ultra-fine tannins and a long, focused finish. Muscular but toned and beautiful. 95-96 points"

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Locations

France

Wine is being produced throughout France and has been done for over 2,500 years with certain Châteaux dating their history back to Roman times, around 6th Century BC. Ranking second in the world in per-capita consumption and first in total production quantity. More so than the overall quantity of wine is the quantity of truly great wines coming out of France makes the nation the envy of wine-making nations worldwide.

Two concepts pivotal to the higher end French wines, in particular, are the idea of 'terroir' and the Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée (AOC) system. Terroir refers to the way the geography, geology and climate find their way into the glass, telling a story of the origin of the wine. The AOC was set up in 1935 and has the primary goal of protecting the authenticity of the wines and the livelihoods of the producers. Appellation rules strictly define which varieties of grapes and winemaking practices are approved for classification in each of France's several hundred geographically defined appellations, which can cover entire regions, individual villages or in some cases, like in Burgundy even specific vineyards.

Classic wine regions in France include Champagne (home of Champagne), Burgundy (Pinot Noir and Chardonnay), Bordeaux (Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Malbec, Petit Verdot), Alsace (Aromatic varietals), Loire Valley (Chenin Blanc, Crémant) and the Rhône Valley (Syrah, Grenache Mourvedre)

The Bordeaux classification of 1855 is still in use, as is the Sauternes and Barsac Classification of the same year. Wines from certain regions can be bought En Primeur, which is when the wine is sold prior to it being bottled.

Bordeaux

Bordeaux produces some of the most highly sought after and revered wines in the world. Located close to the coast, in the south-west of France the town and is divided by the Gironde River. Wines to the west of the river are referred to as left bank, and are Cabernet dominant. To the East of the river, on the right bank Merlot is the dominant grape variety. Throughout the 57 appellations, over 10,000 wine-making châteaux grow the red grapes; Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot and Malbec. These are commonly blended and collectively referred to as clarets. Smaller amounts of Semillon and Sauvignon Blanc is also grown in Bordeaux.

In 1855, due to the high export demands of Bordeaux wines, Emporer Napoleon III requested an official Bordeaux classification system, based on market costs of the wines at the time. The Chateaux were classified in to five ‘growths’ from first growth to fifth growth and cru Bourgois. Also in 1855 The Sauternes and Barsac classification covered the sweeter wines, with Chateau d’Yquem the only Superior First Growth, followed by Premiers Crus and Deux Deuxièmes Crus.

Pauillac

The most Opulent Appellation within Bordeaux, Rich and Powerful Wines. Wine writer Hugh Johnson once said 'If one had to single out one commune of Bordeaux to head the list, there would be no argument. It would be Pauillac'. Wines from Pauillac are known to be the quintessence of Bordeaux wines. Located on the left bank of Gironde, situated between Saint-Julien and Saint-Estephe, the village of Pauillac is the largest in the Médoc with a population of over 5,000. Spanning an area of 1,200 hectares, the grapes grown in the vineyards of this area are mainly Cabernet Sauvignon, but also includes blends of other grape types such as Merlot, Cabernet Franc and Petit Verdot. The terroir of Pauillac differs more than that would be expected of such a relatively small area when compared to the other surrounding wine regions. Because of this, the winemakers of Pauillac have become very experienced in accentuating each of their own unique flavours in a bottle. The overall feel of the region is known to have a stark, blunt style with a dominating fruit flavour of black currant, along with hints of cedar-wood aromas.

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About the brand Chateau Lynch-Bages

Although there are records of the Bages territory as far back as the 16th century, the history of wine production in the area really began in the 18th century. From 1749 to 1824, the vineyard was owned by Thomas Lynch, the son of an Irishman from Galway who worked as a merchant in Bordeaux. Thomas Lynch managed the land wisely and produced high quality wines under the name of 'Cru de Lynch'. As part of the prestigious 1855 Classification, for the Exposition Universelle de Paris, his wine would soon be classified as one of the fifth growths.

Later on, Jean 'Lou Janou' Cazes, a 'Montagnol' (a term used to describe farmers from the austere upper valleys of Ariège), came to the Médoc to earn a living. In the 1930's, General Félix de Vial, a descendant of the Cayrou family, leased the vineyard to Jean-Charles Cazes, the son of 'Lou Janou' and a farmer at Château Ormes de Pez in Saint-Estèphe. Cazes went on to purchase both properties in the wake of World War II. Lynch-Bages has been run by the Cazes family ever since.

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