Chateau Rauzan Segla 2009

SKU
CHRS200912 UCAU
A classic Margaux, this blend of 57% Cabernet Sauvignon and 43% Merlot reveals a dense plum/blue/purple color in addition to a sumptuous perfume of subtle new oak interwoven with underbrush, black currants, black raspberries, spring flowers, and a hint of dusty, loamy soil. Medium to full-bodied with sweet but abundant tannin, and beautiful purity, texture and equilibrium, the 2009 Rauzan Segla will provide enjoyable drinking over the next three decades. About the only thing controversial about the 2009 Rauzan Segla will be the label designed by Chanel’s artistic director, Karl Lagerfeld, for the estate’s 350th anniversary.
Read More
  • weightless, full-bodied, layered style as well as fabulous notes of dark fruits, roasted herbs, graphite, chocolate, and tobacco.
  • A rich and opulent wine,
  • f 57% Cabernet Sauvignon and 43% Merlot
  • Single Bottle
    $450.00
Payment methods
Add to Wish List
In Stock Ready for dispatch from Warehouse same or next business day: Thursday 29th of September.
Black Card Get free freight and more when you’re a member of The Black Card Club. Learn More
Need expert help?
Chat with our Cellar Angel team
Call Us
  • 96
  • 94
  • 95
LOW STOCK - ONLY 2 LEFT

Details

Tasting Profile

  • Light (Light)
    Full (Full)
  • Low Tannin (Low Tannin)
    Tannic (Tannic)
  • Sweet (Sweet)
    Dry (Dry)
  • Low (Low)
    High (High)
  • Aroma
    • Blueberry
    • Boysenberry
    • Herbal
  • Palate
    • Blue Fruits
    • Cassis
    • Graphite

Food Pairings

  • Pork
  • Red Meat

Critic Scores & reviews

  • James Suckling

    96
    "Deep, spicy and earthy, but with plenty of Cabernet Sauvignon cassis aroma and solid tannins giving it a serious structure. It's not the most polished Médoc of the vintage, but there's plenty of concentration and energy driving the long firm finish. Give it more time. Try after 2021"
  • Vinous

    94
    "The 2009 Rauzan-Ségla has a very fine bouquet with tightly packed blackberry and wild strawberry fruit, melted tar and pencil shavings, leaning a little towards Saint-Julien in style (like the Giscours.) The palate is medium-bodied with supple tannin, gorgeous red berry fruit laced with all spice and cumin, gently fanning out towards the grippy but precise finish that is pure class. This is the best bottle that I have encountered, though the less said about the late Karl Lagerfeld's designed label the better!"
  • Jeb Dunnuck

    95
    "The 2009 Rauzan-Ségla shows the style of the vintage perfectly and is a ripe, mouthfilling, sexy Margaux that’s just begging to be drunk. It doesn’t have the sheer density of the 2010 but offers a more weightless, full-bodied, layered style as well as fabulous notes of dark fruits, roasted herbs, graphite, chocolate, and tobacco. A blend of 57% Cabernet Sauvignon and 43% Merlot, it’s going to continue dishing out plenty of pleasure over the coming 20-25 years or more. It’s worth noting that the label here is different due to 2009 being the 350-year anniversary of the estate."

Other vintages

Love this wine? Here's a list of other vintages we have in stock if you'd like to try them as well.

There are no other vintages found.

Current auction

Current live auctions of this product, Explanation of what this tab is about for the customer. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Quisque vulputate vel ex id ultricies. Nam gravida risus non erat feugiat dapibus. Nunc rhoncus ut enim siLorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Quisque vulputate vel ex id ultricies. Nam gravida risus non erat feugiat dapibus. Nunc rhoncus ut enim siLorem ipsum dolor s

Locations

France

Wine is being produced throughout France and has been done for over 2,500 years with certain Châteaux dating their history back to Roman times, around 6th Century BC. Ranking second in the world in per-capita consumption and first in total production quantity. More so than the overall quantity of wine is the quantity of truly great wines coming out of France makes the nation the envy of wine-making nations worldwide.

Two concepts pivotal to the higher end French wines, in particular, are the idea of 'terroir' and the Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée (AOC) system. Terroir refers to the way the geography, geology and climate find their way into the glass, telling a story of the origin of the wine. The AOC was set up in 1935 and has the primary goal of protecting the authenticity of the wines and the livelihoods of the producers. Appellation rules strictly define which varieties of grapes and winemaking practices are approved for classification in each of France's several hundred geographically defined appellations, which can cover entire regions, individual villages or in some cases, like in Burgundy even specific vineyards.

Classic wine regions in France include Champagne (home of Champagne), Burgundy (Pinot Noir and Chardonnay), Bordeaux (Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Malbec, Petit Verdot), Alsace (Aromatic varietals), Loire Valley (Chenin Blanc, Crémant) and the Rhône Valley (Syrah, Grenache Mourvedre)

The Bordeaux classification of 1855 is still in use, as is the Sauternes and Barsac Classification of the same year. Wines from certain regions can be bought En Primeur, which is when the wine is sold prior to it being bottled.

Bordeaux

Bordeaux produces some of the most highly sought after and revered wines in the world. Located close to the coast, in the south-west of France the town and is divided by the Gironde River. Wines to the west of the river are referred to as left bank, and are Cabernet dominant. To the East of the river, on the right bank Merlot is the dominant grape variety. Throughout the 57 appellations, over 10,000 wine-making châteaux grow the red grapes; Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot and Malbec. These are commonly blended and collectively referred to as clarets. Smaller amounts of Semillon and Sauvignon Blanc is also grown in Bordeaux.

In 1855, due to the high export demands of Bordeaux wines, Emporer Napoleon III requested an official Bordeaux classification system, based on market costs of the wines at the time. The Chateaux were classified in to five ‘growths’ from first growth to fifth growth and cru Bourgois. Also in 1855 The Sauternes and Barsac classification covered the sweeter wines, with Chateau d’Yquem the only Superior First Growth, followed by Premiers Crus and Deux Deuxièmes Crus.

Recommended For You

Life is short … so you should savour every sip. That’s why we’ve specifically curated these wines and spirits, especially for you based on your profile, preferences, and past purchases. Enjoy!

Pairs Well With

Whether it's a decadent cheese, mouth-watering red meat, perfectly cooked poultry, succulent seafood, or a vegetarian feast, for every wine or spirit you choose from us, we provide you with a number of helpful suggestions for what will pair deliciously with your purchase.

Frequently Bought With

About the brand Chateau Rauzan Segla

Rauzan-ségla was once part of the vast rausan estate owned by pierre de mesures de rauzan in the mid-17th century. Over time, this estate was divided, and by the time of the 1855 classification, had been separated into the estates of château rauzan-gassies, château rauzan-ségla, château desmirail, and château marquis de terme.

After a long ownership by the durand-dasier family, the estate was acquired by frédéric cruse of the cruse family in 1903 who held ownership until 1957, and until 1989 it belonged to liverpool shipping magnate john holt. by 1982 the estate had hired the consultant services of émile peynaud, and in 1989 the property was purchased by brent walker. whatever plans he had, however, were not to bear fruit; in 1994 he sold the estate on to the wertheimer family of chanel, who installed a winemaking team led by david orr and john kolasa (both from chateau latour). Chanel remain the current owners, and they are credited with continuing to push the quality ever higher.

You May Also Like

Customer Reviews

Write Your Own Review
You're reviewing:Chateau Rauzan Segla 2009
Your Rating

Never want to miss out? Allow Notifications to hear more from us

Remind me later

Thank you! Please check your email inbox to confirm.

Oops! Notifications are disabled.