Chateau Ducru Beaucaillou 2017

SKU
CDCS201710 UCAU
  • "One of the wines of the vintage in the Medoc,"
  • 98 points Jeb Dunnuck
  • 90% Cabernet Sauvignon and 10% Merlot from tiny yields of 35 hectoliters per hectare
  • 1 or more bottles
    $395.00
Add to Wish List
Black Card Get free freight and more when you’re a member of The Black Card Club. Learn More
Need expert help?
Chat with our Cellar Angel team
Call Us
  • James Suckling
    98 points
  • Lisa Perrotti-B
    97+ points
  • Wine Enthusiast
    96 points
  • Wine Spectator
    96 points

Editors notes

As a relatively large estate in Saint-Julien, the 75 hectare Chateau Ducru-Beaucaillou estate is planted to 70% Cabernet Sauvignon and 30% Merlot, at a density of 10,000 vines per hectare. They also own a small parcel of land in Haut-Medoc.

Changes in the winery, and a greater focus on parcel selection for the Grand Vin has resulted in a reduction in output from around 20,000 cases per year in the 1980’s to around 10,000 cases today. And the wines have never looked better. The pair of 2009 and 2010, along with the 2016 are considered standouts for the region, intense and concentrated efforts that will live for many years to come.

Details

Tasting Profile

  • Light (Light)
    Full (Full)
  • Low Tannin (Low Tannin)
    Tannic (Tannic)
  • Sweet (Sweet)
    Dry (Dry)
  • Low Acidity (Low Acidity)
    High Acidity (High Acidity)
  • Aroma
    • Blueberry
    • Boysenberry
    • Herbal
  • Palate
    • Blue Fruits
    • Cassis
    • Graphite

Food Pairings

  • Pork
  • Red Meat

Critic Scores & reviews

  • James Suckling

    98
    "Holy.... This is so powerful and dense with amazing depth of fruit and beautifully ripe tannins tannins. Full body, layers of fruit and tannins. It’s has a long finish but then kicks off at the end. Remains classic in style."
  • Lisa Perrotti-Brown MW

    97+
    "There was no frost at Ducru-Beaucaillou in 2017 due to its proximity to the estuary. This barrel sample comes from the final blend, which was made in early 2018. Composed of 90% Cabernet Sauvignon and 10% Merlot and sporting a deep garnet-purple color, the 2017 Ducru-Beaucaillou is intensely scented of blackcurrant cordial, blackberries and lavender with hints of crushed rocks, iron ore, rose hips and Provence herbs plus touches of wood smoke and sandalwood. Medium-bodied, very firm and grainy in the mouth, it possesses lovely freshness, lifting the intense flavors, finishing long and minerally. Sporting an incredible core of muscular mid-palate fruit, this wine should age incredibly."
  • Wine Enthusiast

    96
    "While this is a dense wine packed with tannins, they never threaten to overwhelm the fruit. The blackberry notes and swathes of ripe fruit give the wine its opulent, ripe and generous character. While the wine will certainly age, it is going to be drinkable relatively soon, certainly by 2024."
  • Wine Spectator

    96
    "This has a warm and inviting feel, with mocha, Christmas pudding and blackberry and plum compote aromas and flavors flowing through atop fleshy, velvety structure. There’s a graphite edge along with some alluring spice accents, and this stays polished and lengthy in the end.—J.M."

Other vintages

Love this wine? Here's a list of other vintages we have in stock if you'd like to try them as well.

There are no other vintages found.

Current auction

All current auctions for this wine & any different vintages.

Locations

France

Wine is being produced throughout France and has been done for over 2,500 years with certain Châteaux dating their history back to Roman times, around 6th Century BC. Ranking second in the world in per-capita consumption and first in total production quantity. More so than the overall quantity of wine is the quantity of truly great wines coming out of France makes the nation the envy of wine-making nations worldwide.

Two concepts pivotal to the higher end French wines, in particular, are the idea of 'terroir' and the Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée (AOC) system. Terroir refers to the way the geography, geology and climate find their way into the glass, telling a story of the origin of the wine. The AOC was set up in 1935 and has the primary goal of protecting the authenticity of the wines and the livelihoods of the producers. Appellation rules strictly define which varieties of grapes and winemaking practices are approved for classification in each of France's several hundred geographically defined appellations, which can cover entire regions, individual villages or in some cases, like in Burgundy even specific vineyards.

Classic wine regions in France include Champagne (home of Champagne), Burgundy (Pinot Noir and Chardonnay), Bordeaux (Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Malbec, Petit Verdot), Alsace (Aromatic varietals), Loire Valley (Chenin Blanc, Crémant) and the Rhône Valley (Syrah, Grenache Mourvedre)

The Bordeaux classification of 1855 is still in use, as is the Sauternes and Barsac Classification of the same year. Wines from certain regions can be bought En Primeur, which is when the wine is sold prior to it being bottled.

Bordeaux

Bordeaux has a rich history of winemaking, dating back to the Roman times. Today, it is known as one of the most significant wine regions in the world, with a reputation for producing complex, full-bodied red wines. The region is home to a diverse range of terroirs, each with its own unique microclimate, soil composition, and grape varieties.

The left bank of Bordeaux is dominated by Cabernet Sauvignon, which thrives in the region's gravelly soils. These wines tend to be bold, tannic, and complex, with notes of blackcurrant, cedar, and tobacco. On the right bank, Merlot is king, producing wines that are softer and fruitier, with notes of plum, cherry, and chocolate.

Aside from the red blends, Bordeaux is also renowned for its sweet wines, particularly from the Sauternes and Barsac appellations. These wines are made using a unique process that involves botrytis, or "noble rot," which concentrates the sugars in the grapes, resulting in a lusciously sweet and complex wine.

Bordeaux's classification system has evolved over time, with some estates moving up or down the ranks depending on the quality of their wines. Today, the system includes five growths, with Premier Cru being the highest and Deuxièmes Crus being the second-highest. There is also a separate classification for the sweet wines of Sauternes and Barsac, with Chateau d’Yquem holding the highest rank.

Overall, Bordeaux is a region that continues to captivate wine enthusiasts around the world with its rich history, diverse terroirs, and exceptional wines.

Medoc

Home to over 650 vineyards and spanning over 4,900 hectares, Bordeaux’s Médoc wine region comprises four of the most distinguished wine villages in the area: Saint-Estephe, Saint-Julien, Pauillac, and Margaux. The peninsula of Médoc is home to coastal lagoons, sand dunes, and pine forests. It is known to have formed into a peninsula over time as the Garonne and Dordogne rivers carried in large quantities of mineral rich silt and light reflective, well drained gravel, which turned out to be perfect for harvesting red wine grapes such as Cabernet Sauvignon and Petit Verdot. The main aromas of the beautifully refined red wines from this area are: spices, oak, red fruit and vanilla.

The region of Médoc is divided into three areas: the Landes du Médoc, the Bas-Médoc, and the Haut-Médoc. The Landes du Médoc is located in the entire western half of the peninsula. Although there are no vineyards here, the land is still important because its pine trees protect the grape vines from the harsh cold winds blowing in from the Atlantic Ocean. The Bas-Médoc( lower-Médoc) runs downstream on the estuarine side of the peninsula. The wines produced here are usually more affordable than those produced in Haut-Médoc. Haut-Médoc (upper-Médoc) is the most well-known of the three sections. The wines produced here are some of the most expensive wines worldwide and were famously ranked in The Médoc Classification of 1855, which is to this day in use.

About the brand Chateau Ducru-Beaucaillou

One of the oldest properties in the Médoc, Château Grand-Puy-Lacoste is a winery in the Pauillac appellation of the Bordeaux region of France. It is also the name of the red wine that this property produces. The wine produced here was one of the 18 Cinquièmes Crus classified in the Bordeaux Wine Official Classification of 1855. The site boasts high-quality soil, a favourable climate, and a team drawing on centuries of experience and expertise. Its proximity to the Atlantic Ocean and the Gironde estuary greatly influences the region’s climate. Strong ocean winds cross the coastal pine forest and slow down as they meet air currents from the estuary, introducing a measure of humidity to the atmosphere. What’s more, the climate features excellent sunshine, hot summers, and mild winters.

You May Also Like

Customer Reviews

Write Your Own Review
You're reviewing:Chateau Ducru Beaucaillou 2017
Your Rating

Never want to miss out? Allow Notifications to hear more from us

Remind me later

Thank you! Please check your email inbox to confirm.

Oops! Notifications are disabled.