Castile and Leon, Baden

The southernmost of Germany's wine regions is primarily a long, slim strip of vineyards nestled between the hills of the Black Forest and the Rhine River, extending some 400 km from north to south.

Comprised of nine districts with a total planted area making up 15,400 hectares under vine, Baden also has many soil types and grape varieties to its name. Nearly half of the vineyards are planted with Burgunder (Pinot) varieties: Spätburgunder (Pinot Noir), yielding velvety to fiery red wine and refreshing Weissherbst (Rosé), ranging in style from dry to slightly sweet; Grauburgunder (Pinot Gris), a dry, food-compatible wine, or marketed under the synonym Ruländer to denote a richer, fuller-bodied (and sweeter) style; and Weissburgunder (Pinot Blanc), neutral enough to accompany many foods. Spicy Gewürztraminer and the noble Riesling are specialties of the Ortenau district near Baden-Baden, where they are known as Clevner and Klingelberger, respectively. Light, mild Gutedel (synonymous with the Chasselas of France and Fendant of Switzerland) is a specialty of the Markgräflerland district between Freiburg and the Swiss border.
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  1. FINCA LUNA BEBERIDE MENCIA 2017
    A recent discovery on our Wine Buyer's trip to Europe, where he saw the popularity of medium-bodied, fresh reds, and knew this would translate to the Australian palate. This Mencia personifies that search in the glass- it's drinkability is tuned ... Learn More
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    Mark Faber
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